Monthly Archives: February 2015

California Citrus Tea

CA Citrus Tea

My in-laws were here for an all-too-brief visit recently. We spent as much time with them as we could, considering that I was deep into my studies, my husband was working and the kids were all in school. Still, it is so rare that we get to see them, so any time at all is a treat.

They also happened to bring a few treats with them. A few adorable things for the kids from their trip to the Bay Area, and some pomelos for my husband and me.

Pommelo Bl

Pomelos are hard to describe. It’s a huge citrus fruit — larger by far than most; it is actually called Citrus maxima. After you’ve peeled the ruggedly bumpy skin, and removed the inch or so of fluffy white pith, you’re left with a fruit that’s about the size of a grapefruit. Speaking of grapefruit, the taste is somewhere between a grapefruit and a lemon, but without the hint of bitterness that gives grapefruit its savor. Instead, it has a gentle fragrance that is slightly floral with a tiny bit of musk. These are light, bright and delicious.

While my immediate thought was how wonderful it would be to candy the peel — seriously, one fruit is so big you’d have it forever — my first taste of the tart flesh changed my focus. Trying to stay healthy while the family drops like flies around me, I knew I needed to turn it into this delicious, soothing tea.

All of the ingredients are so healing: turmeric, full of anti-inflammatory curcumin, and the black pepper which helps activate it; honey and ginger, which help fight off nasty bugs; and of course, pomelos are full of vitamin C. This is not the prettiest drink, by any means — I nearly called this “Ugly Tea” — but the soothing heat and tangy flavor are gorgeous.

Pomelo & Spice Tea

Ingredients

  • 2 segments pomelo, peeled and separated into small chunks (may substitute lemon or other citrus)
  • 1" knob of ginger, peeled and grated
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon honey

Instructions

  1. Combine pomelo, ginger, turmeric, black pepper, and honey in a cup; add 1/2 cup boiling water. With a fork, mash the ingredients together, then add enough water to fill the cup.
  2. Serve immediately.
http://www.paleopluslife.com/california-citrus-tea/

Paleo Off-Roading

image

Lately, I am having the sorts of days where I do things like wash a load of laundry and then accidentally pour laundry soap on it again. Or I start to do something walk into a room and then forget why I came into it. Where I look into the fridge and the only food to be found is a bunch of rainbow carrots, a bottle of lemon juice and a jar of strawberries I pickled in 2013.

 I can just about manage a load of laundry every other day — the piles that six people create are frankly shocking — and by and large, I remember to feed us all. Our little routines are taking on more importance; family movie night was always important, but is now a Big Deal, and Friday afternoon pizza seems to be A Thing for the youngest two. (I just discovered that our favorite pizza place does gluten free slices, which is very exciting.)

Speaking of pizza, I wanted to talk about “off-roading”, which is my phrase for foods that aren’t strictly Paleo. We do a fair bit of off-roading here, particularly when I’m in a busy period like the one I’m having now.

While I’m still avoiding the biggest Paleo no-nos (gluten, I’m looking at you) , I do think that there are solid reasons to consider these foods:

Beans: These get a lot of flak, because of their gas-inducing qualities, and also because their natural defense mechanisms are believed to be irritating to the gut. Dr. Alan Christianson, author of the Adrenal Reset Diet, makes a pretty good case for not worrying about eating beans in this article.

Rice: Of all the foods, I think rice was what my second-most missed during my Whole30 (oatmeal was most, believe it or not). But when I gave it a try during the re-introduction period, I my body reacted very strongly. I got the shakes and was dizzy about 30 minutes after eating.  Since then, I have cautiously re-introduced rice to my diet. As long as I don’t have too much at a sitting, and I accompany it with a good portion of protein and fat, I do okay.
Mark Sisson of Mark’s Daily Apple explains why, surprisingly, the occasional meal with white rice is not that bad, as long as it isn’t displacing better, more nutrient-dense foods in your diet.

White Potatoes: This one, oddly, feels like the biggest “cheat” to me. It’s largely because when I started eating paleo via a Whole30, we gave up white potatoes entirely. My husband, as I’ve mentioned, has diabetes, and white potatoes were not on the menu for us much anyway, but going off them was still a big deal.
However, as explained by Melissa and Dallas Hartwig in this post, white potatoes are actually pretty nutritious and thus, are now permitted on the Whole30. Because they are still pretty dense sources of carbohydrate, when we do have white potatoes, I tend to combine them with lower-carb veggies like cauliflower or rutabaga, or to use them as an ingredient in a stew or casserole rather than as a dish in their own right. It works for us.

What are your gray area/off-road paleo foods? Let me know in the comments.

Not a Four-Letter Word

Silly Cher | Paleo + Life

On our honeymoon, 2005

My, oh my.

At this moment, I am feeling deeply moved by Sarah Ballantyne, The Paleo Mom, who has shared a truly epic post about stress an]e last two years of her life. I highly recommend you take a look. I have not been this inspired by a blog post in a good long while.

Deeply inspired, but also really, really tired.

I am trying to take the lesson from Sarah and be pro-active in managing my stress. To do that, I have to admit sooner rather than later that I am feeling the strain. Bar study, combined with my regular family responsibilities, is really pushing me over the edge.

That doesn’t mean that I want to stop doing any of what I’m doing. I love blogging; it’s an immense relief from thinking about civil procedure and constitutional law and wills and trusts and all the other 4,037 rules of law that I am supposed to know, cold, when I finally take my exam. And of course, I can’t exactly leave my family behind — nor would I want to do so (mostly; sometimes, when the bickering starts, a desert island doesn’t sound so bad).

So I’m trying, instead, to help myself by recognizing the overwhelmed feelings and being pro-active about getting a little relief. I’ve shared my current supplement routine here before. These days, I’ve added ashwagandha and NAC to the mix. Ashwagandha is another adaptogenic herb meant to support the immune system, which makes me less likely to come down with the creeping crud, while NAC helps my body produce glutathione (an incredibly important anti-oxidant for general health that can be lacking in people under a lot of stress or who have autoimmune conditions).

I’m also attempting to get more sleep (always a difficult thing for me), and to be more present when I am not actively studying. Sleep, obviously, makes everything else I do for myself better and more effective — it’s just a matter of remembering that fact when I am tempted to short-change myself.
Presence, of course, is always something to strive for. It is often incredibly difficult for me to disentangle from thoughts of what else I “should” be doing … and it always seems there is something else I should be doing. So this challenge to myself will be even more important as I enter the home stretch of my studies. Just because I need to focus on the bar doesn’t mean the rest of my life needs to be neglected.

What about you? As you head into the second month of the New Year, what are the things you want to focus on? Please feel free to drop a line in the comments.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...