Paleo Off-Roading

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Lately, I am having the sorts of days where I do things like wash a load of laundry and then accidentally pour laundry soap on it again. Or I start to do something walk into a room and then forget why I came into it. Where I look into the fridge and the only food to be found is a bunch of rainbow carrots, a bottle of lemon juice and a jar of strawberries I pickled in 2013.

 I can just about manage a load of laundry every other day — the piles that six people create are frankly shocking — and by and large, I remember to feed us all. Our little routines are taking on more importance; family movie night was always important, but is now a Big Deal, and Friday afternoon pizza seems to be A Thing for the youngest two. (I just discovered that our favorite pizza place does gluten free slices, which is very exciting.)

Speaking of pizza, I wanted to talk about “off-roading”, which is my phrase for foods that aren’t strictly Paleo. We do a fair bit of off-roading here, particularly when I’m in a busy period like the one I’m having now.

While I’m still avoiding the biggest Paleo no-nos (gluten, I’m looking at you) , I do think that there are solid reasons to consider these foods:

Beans: These get a lot of flak, because of their gas-inducing qualities, and also because their natural defense mechanisms are believed to be irritating to the gut. Dr. Alan Christianson, author of the Adrenal Reset Diet, makes a pretty good case for not worrying about eating beans in this article.

Rice: Of all the foods, I think rice was what my second-most missed during my Whole30 (oatmeal was most, believe it or not). But when I gave it a try during the re-introduction period, I my body reacted very strongly. I got the shakes and was dizzy about 30 minutes after eating.  Since then, I have cautiously re-introduced rice to my diet. As long as I don’t have too much at a sitting, and I accompany it with a good portion of protein and fat, I do okay.
Mark Sisson of Mark’s Daily Apple explains why, surprisingly, the occasional meal with white rice is not that bad, as long as it isn’t displacing better, more nutrient-dense foods in your diet.

White Potatoes: This one, oddly, feels like the biggest “cheat” to me. It’s largely because when I started eating paleo via a Whole30, we gave up white potatoes entirely. My husband, as I’ve mentioned, has diabetes, and white potatoes were not on the menu for us much anyway, but going off them was still a big deal.
However, as explained by Melissa and Dallas Hartwig in this post, white potatoes are actually pretty nutritious and thus, are now permitted on the Whole30. Because they are still pretty dense sources of carbohydrate, when we do have white potatoes, I tend to combine them with lower-carb veggies like cauliflower or rutabaga, or to use them as an ingredient in a stew or casserole rather than as a dish in their own right. It works for us.

What are your gray area/off-road paleo foods? Let me know in the comments.

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2 thoughts on “Paleo Off-Roading

  1. Kara @ Yaya Recommended

    I’m pretty much with you on all of these! Beans, rice, and potatoes–that’s what I grew up eating! I’ve been reading about the proper way to prepare beans, but I rarely make them, and I’ll occasionally eat a little bit of white rice at a restaurant. The only thing I cook at home sometimes would be potatoes, but as an ingredient, not an entire dish. I tend to do better and feel better eating lower-carb, so that’s what I stick to.

    Reply
    1. Cher Post author

      I hear you, Kara! These were staples in our house, too, and even though I try to stay lower carb the majority of the time, it’s nice to occasionally have them back on the menu.

      Reply

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